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Faculty Guide to Collections & Services

copyright

Dictionary result for copyright

/ˈkäpēˌrīt/
noun
  1. the exclusive legal right, given to an originator or an assignee to print, publish, perform, film, or record literary, artistic, or musical material, and to authorize others to do the same.
    "he issued a writ for breach of copyright" (Google Dictionary)

What is Copyright?

The Copyright Act of 1976 laid the foundation for modern-day copyright law. 

According to the Copyright Clearance Center, "...copyright law exists to foster creativity and spur the distribution of new and original works. The law grants copyright holders, such as publishers, writers and other types of creators, the exclusive right to reproduce, perform, distribute, translate and publicly display their original works. Simply stated, this means that unless your situation meets one of the exceptions outlined in the Copyright Act, you must get explicit permission from the copyright holder before you can lawfully reuse, reproduce or redistribute a copyright-protected work – even within the walls of your institution" (The Campus Guide to Copyright Compliance).

At William James College, we respect the rights of creators and aim to educate our community about the law. Creators rely upon copyright law to ensure that their works are not copied or modified without permission and/or payment. This protection fosters creativity and promotes publishing.

Advances in technology make sharing easier than ever before. It is important in this digital age to keep the best interests of the creators of content in mind. Just because you can post something on the internet does not mean you should. To help you navigate the confusing world of copyright, please read the William James College Library Copyright Compliance and Course Reserves Policy and peruse this copyright guide. If you have any questions or concerns – as creator or consumer – please do not hesitate to contact the library.

Examples of Copyright

Nearly all written and visual works are copyrighted, including everything you create. But beware, you might not own the copyright for all works you create! 

Some examples of works you create, but might not own the copyright for include:

  • syllabi
  • lecture slides
  • unpublished articles, chapters, reports, etc. created using WJC resources
  • published articles, chapters, reports, etc. (Check contracts carefully! The publisher might just own your work and limit what you can do with it.)
  • content created while work-for-hire

It is important to know your rights as a creator. If you have any questions about IP or copyright, please contact julia_clement@williamjames.edu

Why Does Copyright Matter?

At William James College, we respect the rights of creators and aim to educate our community about the law. Creators rely upon copyright law to ensure that their works are not copied or modified without permission and/or payment. This protection fosters creativity and promotes publishing.

Advances in technology make sharing easier than ever before. It is important in this digital age to keep the best interests of the creators of content in mind. Just because you can post something on the internet does not mean you should. To help you navigate the confusing world of copyright, please read the William James College Library Copyright Compliance and Course Reserves Policy and peruse this copyright guide. If you have any questions or concerns – as creator or consumer – please do not hesitate to contact the library.